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Undergraduate

Course Descriptions

201 Introduction to Creative Writing. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 with a C or better) A course that introduces the fundamental elements of craft involved in composing poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and drama using a combination of example readings and writing workshops. Students are encouraged, though not required, to complete a college-level literature course before enrolling in ENGL 201. F, S, Su.

 

205 Literature and Culture. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better). This course is designed to provoke and cultivate students’ imaginative and critical understanding of literature in various cultural contexts. Text (in poetry, drama, fiction, and/or creative nonfiction) will vary by section. Each section will examine compelling themes, styles, and cultural arguments within their literary, historical, and philosophical contexts. F, S, Su.

 

209 Q* Blue Ridge to Blue Sea: Cultures of the American South. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101) This course will immerse students in diverse perspectives on the American South by investigating the ways in which the multifaceted cultural spaces and histories from “Blue Ridge” to “Blue Sea” are reflected in literature and other media. Alternating F, S.

 

211 Introduction to Technical and Professional Writing. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better) Students read and analyze examples of technical, scientific, and professional writing. Writing assignments may include formal and informal reports, sets of instructions, research papers, annotated bibliographies, literature reviews, process analyses, position papers, or mechanism descriptions. Revising and editing skills are taught. F, S, Su.

 

231 Film, New Media and Culture. (3) (=NMDC 231) (Prereq: ENGL 101) This course is designed to provoke and cultivate students’ imaginative and critical understanding of film and new media in various cultural contexts. The course promotes an active and critical engagement with film, new media texts, and media innovations as a means for analysis and critique within the broader framework of humanistic inquiry. Texts and films will vary by section. F, S.

 

275 Masterpieces of World Literature I. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better). Selected readings of Western and non-Western literature from antiquity to the Renaissance. Students write primarily analytical essays. Some research is required. All readings are in English. F, S, Su.

 

276 Masterpieces of World Literature II. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better). Selected readings of Western and non-Western literature from the Renaissance to modern times. Students write primarily analytical essays. Some research is required. All readings are in English. F, S, Su.

 

277 Literature Across Cultures. (3) (Prereq: Completion of (1) ENGL 101 and (2) ENGL 102 or ENGL 211) This course is designed to introduce students to works of literature in translation from the Eastern and/or Western literary and intellectual traditions. Drawing from a variety of texts, genres, and formats, each section will examine issues of cultural interaction and translation, emphasizing the significance of cross-cultural dialogue and transfer of ideas between world cultures, historical periods, and/or literary movements.

 

290 Introduction to Business Communication. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 with a C or better) Students will gain valuable experience with some of the most important types of written and oral communication required in a business and professional context. F, S, Su.

 

300 Critical Conversations in English. (3) (Prereq: Completion of (1) ENGL 101, (2) ENGL 102 or ENGL 211, and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course) A research-intensive course that offers English majors the opportunity to examine a critical issue current in the discipline of English studies and to participate in a rigorous exchange about this issue with their peers. Depending on the demonstrated scholarly expertise and active research agenda of the instructor, the course will explore a range of theoretical and historical models of reading and reception. English majors should take the course in the first semester of their junior year (or for more advanced majors, during the second semester of their sophomore year). Sections of the course will be offered in both Fall and Spring semesters and enrollment will be limited to 20 students. May be repeated for credit once under a different instructor. F, S.

 

301 Creative Writing Workshop. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better). A course that introduces the fundamentals of composing poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction and other types of creative writing using a combination of example readings and writing workshops. F, S.

 

302 The Renaissance. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A survey of English literature of the Sixteenth Century from Thomas More’s Utopia to William Shakespeare’s comedies and histories.

 

303 British Literature I. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or ENGL 211 and one other 200 level course) A survey of representative works illustrating the development of British literature from its beginning through the eighteenth century, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts. F.

 

304 British Literature II. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or ENGL 211 and one other 200 level course) A survey of representative works illustrating the development of British literature from the late eighteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts. S.

 

305 American Literature I. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A survey of representative works illustrating the development of American literature from its beginnings through the mid-nineteenth century, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts. F.

 

306 American Literature II. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A survey of representative works illustrating the development of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts. S.

 

307 The Age of Chaucer. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) Masterpieces of fourteenth-century poetry and drama, including Pearl, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and works of the Wakefield Master. About one-third of the course is devoted to works of Chaucer not read in English 401.

 

308 Seventeenth-Century British Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and or ENGL 205) A study of the major English poets, dramatists, and prose writers of the Seventeenth Century.

 

311 Topics in Shakespeare. (3) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101, (2) ENGL 102 or ENGL 211, or any ENGL course at the 200 level or above) In this course students will be familiarized with plays that represent the spectrum of Shakespeare’s drama, including comedies, tragedies, histories, romances, and problem plays. We may approach these texts from cultural, theatrical, socio-historical, and literary perspectives, and read each play closely as an artistic construction, a script for popular consumption, and a commentary on the political atmosphere of a period both similar to and different from our own. We may also consider the present place of Shakespeare’s drama in diverse cultures around the world. F.

314 Eighteenth-Century British Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and or ENGL 205) A historical and critical study of the prose and poetry of the principal Eighteenth-Century writers. Emphasis on the works of Dryden, Defoe, Pope, Swift, and others.

 

315 The British Novel I. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A survey of the British novel from the beginning through the early Victorian era.

 

316 The British Novel II. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A survey of the British novel from the mid-Victorian era to the present.

 

317 The Romantic Age. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A study of the Eighteenth-Century transition from Classicism to Romanticism and of major Romantic writers.

 

318 The Victorian Age. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A study of major mid-and late-Nineteenth-Century British writers, including Hardy, George Eliot, Dickens, Tennyson, the Brownings, and others.

 

320 Writing Tutor Training. (1) (=UNIV 320) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101, (2) ENGL 102 or ENGL 211, or any ENGL course at the 200 level or above) This course introduces students to both theoretical and practical concerns, issues, and questions central to the work of a writing center. As they investigate current trends in writing center scholarship, a variety of writing center models, and their own practices as tutors, students will question the practice of tutoring as they develop their own reflective stances. As it models effective center practices, this course will benefit current tutors, student hoping to tutor, students interested in education, or those considering graduate school. S.

 

322 Latin American Literature in Translation. (3) (=SPAN 322) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) Selected readings of Latin American Literature in translation. Students write primary critical essays. All readings are in English. Even years.

323 Modern British and Irish Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and or ENGL 205) A study of the works of British and Irish writers from the turn of the Twentieth Century to 1945.

 

325 Colonial and Revolutionary American Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A study of early American literature with emphasis on the religious, philosophical, social, and political aspects.

326 American Literature 1800-1865. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A reading of representative works of Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson, and other writers of the period.

 

327 American Literature 1860-1910. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A study of American literature from the Civil War to the early Twentieth Century. Emphasis on the changing attitudes reflected in the works of writers of this period.

 

328 Modern American Writers. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A study of the works of American writers in the first half of the Twentieth Century.

 

329 Autobiographies, Journals, and Memoirs. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A study of selected Eighteenth-, Nineteenth-, and Twentieth-Century autobiographical writing in English. Students read selected Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century autobiographies, journals, and memoirs and explore the ways in which recent writers (in particular women and minorities) have challenged and revised the conventions of this genre. Students are required to produce some autobiographical writing.

 

330 Realism and Naturalism. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101, ENGL 102/ENGL 211 and one other 200 level ENGL class) A course that offers an intensive study of the historical phenomenon of literary realism and naturalism as it emerged in nineteenth-century France literature and its subsequent development in and influence on British and American Literature and drama.

 

331 Critical Approaches to New Media. (3) (=NMDC 331) (Prereq: ENGL 231 or NMDC 231) This course is required for a minor. This course introduces students to the criticism and theory defining the field of New Media studies. The class will explore some of the major historical, cultural, sociopolitical, philosophical, and critical trends in this field.

 

333 The American Novel. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A study of selected American novels.

 

336 Contemporary American Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and or ENGL 205) A study of the literary trends in America from 1945 to the present.

 

339 Popular Fiction. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or ENGL 211 and one other 200 level ENGL class) What makes popular fiction popular? Why do we find pleasure in reading these texts? How are the various genres (detective, hard-boiled crime, western romance, horror, fantasy, science fiction, and thriller) structured and what cultural viewpoints do these formulas reinforce? As we read and discuss sample of each genre, including works by Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, Louis L'Amour, Stephen King, J.R.R. Tolkein, and Octavia Bulter, we will be looking at the texts through the critical lenses of literary theory, including psychoanalytic, feminist, Marxist, and structuralist approaches. We will also use this study of popular fiction to raise questions about authorship, readership, literary value, and the mass marketing strategies used to sell these texts.

 

341 African-American Literature, 1750-present. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better ENGL 205) A survey of Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century literature. Emphasis on the classic works of Frederick Douglass, Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, and Ralph Ellison.

 

350 Language Variation in North America. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and or ENGL 205) Language variation in North America is considered from a contemporary sociolinguistic perspective. The course covers social, regional, ethnic, gender and style-related language variation among (English) speakers in the United States and Canada. The course will also explore issues of perception and attitude as reflected in evaluations of language varieties and the speakers of those varieties.

 

351 Language, Gender, and Power. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or ENGL 211 and one other 200 level ENGL class) The course investigates language structure and usage patterns in the context of gender to achieve a better understanding of the way language references, and the perceptions, attitudes and behaviors related to these differences are examined.

 

352 African American English. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or ENGL 211 and one other 200 level ENGL class) A course that explores African American English from a linguistics and social perspective. Course content will focus on hypotheses of the development of African American English, linguistic theory as applied to African American English, and social/cultural dimensions of African American English.

 

354 English Grammar and Syntax. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, ENGL 205) This course examines individual components of modern English grammar from a formal perspective in the formation of phrases, clauses, and sentences. Students will analyze the patterned, rule governed nature of language through a study of syntax in standard and nonstandard varieties of English, especially in examples of written texts, and will apply grammar concepts to their own writing.

 

362 Reading and Writing Fiction. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 201 or ENGL 301) A literature and workshop course designed to study published contemporary short stories and creates original works of short fiction. Students will read and critique both published and student work. F.

 

365 Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 201 or ENGL 301) Literature and workshop course designed to study published contemporary creative nonfiction and create original work of creative nonfiction. Students will read and critique both published and student work. S.

 

368 Reading and Writing Poetry. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 201 or ENGL 301) A course designed to improve the students’ abilities to read and write poetry. The first half of the course focuses on reading poetry in order to understand the craft of its author. The second half of the course is a poetry workshop in which students develop their abilities writing in the genre. S.

 

371 Topics in World Literature: East/West Intersections. (3) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101 (2) ENGL 102 or ENGL 211, and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course) This course extends students’ understanding of and experiences in different cultures of the world by examining issues of cross-cultural interaction and transfer of ideas between and within world cultures, historical periods, and/or literary movements. The course will also introduce students to some strategies of literary criticism and research on world authors through examination of critical texts appropriate to the topic. In particular, this course will sharpen awareness of the various intersections between traditions of the East and West. Alternating F, S.

 

373 Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Asian and Western Drama. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) Comparative study of Western and Asian dramatic literature through the focus of shared themes and cultural relationships – parallels, influences, variations, historical encounters. Students will explore relevant aesthetic theories, world views and philosophical outlooks, patterns of human relationships, social functions of drama, and performance styles that will open up a new cross-cultural dialog.

 

375 Special Topics in World and Anglophone Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) This course extends students’ understanding of and experiences in different cultures of the world by examining issues of cross-cultural interaction and transfer of ideas between and within world cultures, historical periods, and/or literary movements. The course will also introduce students to come strategies of literary criticism and research on world authors through examination of critical texts appropriate to the topic. S.

 

376 Confessional Literatures: East/West. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and or ENGL 205) This course offers a comparative, cross-cultural study of the confessional mode of writing in both the Western and non-Western traditions. The course investigates the intersections of 1) confession and literary writing; and 2) what we call “East” and “West.” The course examines a wide variety of texts, novels, short stories, essays, diaries, letters, and screenplays, and introduces major theoretical views on confessional literatures. The course pays attention to social, historical, cultural, and religious contexts but will focus on the language of confession.

 

379 Topics in Film Studies. (3) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101, (2) ENGL 102 or ENGL 211, and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course.) Drawing from a variety of genres and styles, historical movements and production contexts, themes and national traditions, this course explores major concepts in film studies as academic discipline. Course content may privilege the work of a particular director, a movement or theme. The course consists of a 75-minute lecture/discussion session and a mandatory 2-hour screening lab each week.

 

382 Contemporary Fiction. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205) A study of new fiction in English and other languages (in translation).

 

386 Topics in Contemporary Poetry. (3) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101, (2) ENGL 102 or ENGL 211, and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course) A study of the poetry of a variety of contemporary American and British poets.

 

390 Business and Professional Communication. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 or ENGL 101B; and ENGL 102 or ENGL 102B; or ENGL 290. All with a minimum grade of C) Designed to improve practical communication, both written and oral. Students learn business style and formats (the letter, memo, resume, and report), as well as strategies for presenting neutral, negative, and persuasive messages. Students will speak on business or professional topics. F, S.

 

399 Independent Study. (3) (Prereq: written contract between student and instructor, approved by adviser, Chair of the English Department, and Associate Dean of Humanities and Fine Arts. Approval must be gained by the end of the semester that precedes the semester in which the independent study is undertaken.) A maximum of 12 credit hours of 399 may be applied to a B.A. degree. Courses numbered 399 may not be used to fulfill requirements for core curriculum or English core (Major). May be repeated for credit under different topics.

 

401 Chaucer. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) A study of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, with some attention to his other major works.

 

404 Topics in Non-Shakespearean Renaissance Literature. (3) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101, (2) ENGL 102 or ENGL 211, or any ENGL course at the 200 level or above) This course will focus on the study of Renaissance texts in various genres, with emphasis on non-Shakespearean literatures. Readings and themes will vary by semester, but our analysis will include: the construction and representation of high and low cultures of Renaissance literature; the relationship of the literature to the specific political, intellectual, and social environments within which it was produced; the relationship of gender and authorship; and the transhistorical and transcultural influences of Renaissance literature. F, S.

 

409 Theories of Gender and Sexuality. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102/ENGL 211 and one other 200 level ENGL class). In this course, we will explore theories that have contributed to current debates about representations of men and women, constructions of femininity and masculinity, and the implications of sexuality. The first half of the course will focus on several key essays in feminist theory. In the second half of the semester, we will explore other developments in gender and sexuality studies, including the origins of queer theory and transgender studies. The study of theoretical works will be interspersed with the application of those theories to works of literature and film. Over the course of the semester we will consider the intersections of gender with race, class, age and nationality as we examine the relevance of reading, writing, and filmmaking to our understanding of gender and sexuality.

 

411 English Capstone Seminar. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 300 and Senior standing) This class provides a forum for both reflection upon and assessment of the student’s experience in the major. Readings and writing assignments will focus on the discipline of English in a postgraduate context, the professional potential of the English degree, portfolio construction, and revision of existing writings for publications. The course will also include activities designed to help the department assess its program as well as the opportunity for an exit interview. F.

 

424 Studies in British Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) Intensive study of topics selected by the professor teaching the course. May be repeated with the approval of the Department Chair. May be repeated for credit under different topics.

 

425 World Dramatic Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) A critical and historical survey of the cardinal works of dramatic literature across the epochs of theatrical performance. The course accents analysis and interpretation.

 

427 Studies in Southern Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) A critical study of the Twentieth-Century Southern literary tradition. The course examines regional interests shaping the emergence of a Southern literature and the distinctive characteristics of the literature, focusing especially on the writings of William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, Tennessee Williams, Robert Penn Warren, and Walker Percy.

 

431 New Media and Literature. (3) (=NMDC 431) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or ENGL 211 and one other 200 level ENGL course) This course is required for a minor. This class will explore the future (and past) of literature in the digital age. We will begin with some historical examples of hypertext (that is, in its original meaning, text that goes “beyond” or “above” limitations of the written word) from Heraclitus, Dante, early modern broadsides, Blake and Woolf. The second part of the class will be dedicated to encounters with the literature and criticism of New Media. We will continue with some pre-professional preparation designed to make English majors aware of the changing textual landscape of their discipline.

 

443 Topics in Women Writers. (3) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101, (2) ENGL 102 or ENGL 211, and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course.) A study of selected works of Western and non-Western women writers.

 

451 Introduction to the Study of Language and Modern Grammar. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) An introduction to the general principles concerning the design and function of human language, and an overview of the history of grammar with emphasis upon modern grammatical theory. Illustrative material is drawn from the English language, modern European languages, and others. F.

 

453 Development of the English Language. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) A study of the origins and development of languages in general, and of English and related languages in particular. No previous knowledge of Old and Middle English necessary. S.

 

457 Form and Style in Writing. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) A writing intensive course that focuses on the essential processes of research and writing. The course covers the details of format and matters of style for MLA, APA, and Chicago. Students receive help with every step of the process in completing their writing projects.

 

459 Advanced Composition and Rhetoric. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) Writing that involves different aims, types, and audiences. Students learn theory about composition, rhetoric, and reading. Students also read examples, do library research, and review grammar, punctuation, and editing. F, S, Su.

 

462 Writing Workshop-Fiction. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 362 or permission of the instructor) A workshop course in the writing of prose fiction. Students have the opportunity to have their works read and criticized by a group of fellow writers. F.

 

465 Creative Nonfiction Workshop. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 365 or permission of the instructor) A workshop course in the writing of creative nonfiction. Students learn the craft of this “fourth genre,” developing skills in memoir, personal essay, nature writing, and/or other subgenres of creative nonfiction. F.

 

468 Writing Workshop-Poetry. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 201 or ENGL 301) A workshop course in the writing of poetry. Students learn the craft of poetry, have their poems discussed in a workshop setting, and are guided in the preparation and submission of manuscripts for publication. F.

 

472 Topics in Dramatic Literature. (3) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101, (2) ENGL 102 or ENGL 211, and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course) This course offers an intensive study of dramatic literature, drawing from a variety of styles, periods, themes, historical movements and contexts, and national traditions. Topics and themes vary by semester. F, S, Su.

 

475 Contemporary Asian Fiction. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) A critical study of works by modern and contemporary Asian fiction writers in translation in their literary, social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Drawing from one or more Asian literary traditions, this course explores issues of gender and sexuality, nationalism and colonialism, post colonialism and national trauma, responses to modernization and globalization, consumerism and popular culture, among others.

 

477 Asian Cinemas. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) This course comparatively examines Asia’s cinematic traditions from the point of view of shred themes, aesthetics and cultural concerns, and in the context of past and current socio-political and cultural transformations and border-crossings. Drawing from a variety of genres and styles, historical movements and production contexts, this course may explore issues of gender and sexuality, nationalism and colonialism, post colonialism and national trauma, responses to modernization and globalization, consumerism and popular culture. The course consists of a 75-minute lecture/discussion session and a mandatory 2- hour screening lab each week.

 

479 Studies in Modern and Contemporary British and Anglophone Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or ENGL 211, and one other 200 level ENGL class) This course will explore the impact of globalization on literature and film of the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will read contemporary Anglophone and British novels and view some films, each of which has gained prominence by winning prizes, selling widely, or achieving critical acclaim. Together we will investigate how these narratives from diverse cultures respond to and participate in increasingly globalized international system. Are different cultural traditions and narratives being homogenized into a standard format, or is new diversity being introduced through evolving uses of the English language, unfamiliar themes, and new ways of telling stories?

 

480 Special Topics in Technical Communications. (3) (Prereq: Completion of ENGL 210 and ENGL 211 with a B or better, and ENGL 212 and ARTD 201; Junior standing) An intensive workshop focusing on a specific topic in technical communication. Topics will vary and may include Computer Documentation (hardware and software, including user guides, reference manuals, quick reference guides, tutorials, and online documentation); Grant/Proposal Writing; Scientific/Medical Writing; Hypermedia authoring. May be repeated for academic credit. F.

 

483 Theory of Literary Criticism. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) A study of various theories of literary criticism as applied to the major genres (fiction, poetry, and drama) with the aim of establishing standards of judgment.

 

484 Children’s Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 or ENGL 101B and ENGL 102 with a C or better and ENGL 205 with a C or better) This course is designed to introduce you to the study of works appropriate for the elementary and middle school child.

 

485 Adolescent Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) An extensive study of works appropriate for the adolescent. Required of all Secondary English Education students.

 

487 Literary Studies in Health, Illness, and Aging. (3) (Prereq: one literature class at the 200 level or above or permission of the instructor) This course will offer students an opportunity to read, think, and write about literary texts that engage with the implications of human embodiment. Readings and thematic focus will vary by semester, and may incorporate a range of geographical locations, historical periods, and literary genres. Through reading and discussion students will consider how categories like health and illness, youth and age, or ability and disability are depicted and sometimes challenged in literary texts, and will examine how illness or disability might affect the constitution of identity, enabling new kinds of stories and new ways of telling them. Alternating F, S.

 

488 Studies in World Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) Intensive study of topics selected by the professor teaching this course. May be repeated and used for English credit with approval of the Department Chair.

 

489 Gender and Sexuality in Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing). Course employs feminist principles, philosophies, and pedagogies, to examine literary and/or theoretical treatments of gender and sexuality. Topics vary from semester to semester and may include issues such as sexual identity, queer theory, feminist criticism, and masculinity studies.

 

495 Internship for English Majors. (3-12) (Prereq: C or better in ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) Three credit hours may be applied toward the English major. Students will receive instruction and gain professional experience in an internship while working at least 10 hours per week with a local business or organization. Course contract must be approved prior to registration.

 

496 Senior Thesis in English. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 300 A, B) Students will design and execute an original research project with the guidance, support and oversight of the class instructor. Students are encouraged to choose a research mentor from among the full-time faculty in the Department of English, but the final evaluation of the project is the responsibility of the course instructor. Students will publicly present their projects at the conclusion of the course.

 

497 Special Topics: Literature, Language, Location. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) Course Restrictions: Students will take course as part of approved Coastal Carolina University travel/study programs. Course is a selective. Students will undertake the study of literature and/or the English language in the context of significant national or international travel. Under the guidance of faculty experienced in external study, and taking advantage of site-specific resources, students will explore how direct knowledge of place can lead to insight into the literary and cultural productions of a civilization. Most often, students will study primary texts before travel, and the most common itineraries will include visits to libraries, museums, historic landmarks and locations of cultural significance.

 

499 Studies in American Literature. (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better, C or better in one other ENGL course, and Junior standing) Intensive study of topics selected by the professor teaching the course. May be repeated with the approval of the Department Chair.